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Leti Muñoz/UW Department of Global Health 
Communication Manager
lmunoz2@uw.edu


 

The latest news

Pamela Collins, advocate for mental health and community voice, named 2023 MLK Service Awardee

UW School of Public Health

Pamela Collins is the 2023 recipient of the MLK Community Service Award. Given annually by the UW Health Sciences schools and UW Medicine Office of Healthcare Equity, this award honors individuals or groups who exemplify Martin Luther King, Jr.’s principles.

Dr. Pamela Collins, professor of global health and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

Do Rapid Tests Still Work?

The New York Times

Experts say that rapid home tests are still a helpful tool for stopping the spread of COVID-19, but they’re not foolproof. Here are a few explanations for why you might get a false negative result — and how to increase your chances of accuracy next time.

Dr. Paul Drain, associate professor of global health and of medicine in the UW School of Medicine, is quoted.

How a series of questions helped Kenneth Mugwanya fight the HIV epidemic

UW School of Public Health

Kenneth Mugwanya’s first question — how to prevent people from getting infected with HIV — led him to leave his first job and join the infectious Diseases Institute at Makerere University in Uganda as a research study physician, where he began working with UW researchers who were also asking this question.  

Dr. Kenneth Mugwanya, assistant professor of global health and of epidemiology at the UW, is interviewed.

Alumna Highlight: Veronica Davé, PhD - Pathobiology

What year did you graduate:

2020

Favorite part about grad school:

The community of students in Pathobiology, and being a part of the larger science and global health community in Seattle. I loved how interdisciplinary the training was in Pathobiology. I felt like I learned how to listen to and present to colleagues across a wide spectrum of specialties within infectious disease and global health research.

Favorite Pathobiology memory:

Why Rapid COVID-19 Test Results Are Getting More Confusing

Time

Experts say ambiguous results on at-home tests may be more common now — but not because rapid tests aren’t working. In fact, these confusing results could actually be a good thing, at least as far as your immune system goes.

Dr. Paul Drain, associate professor of global health and of medicine in the UW School of Medicine, is quoted.